Thursday, August 7, 2014

Reversible

Time out from multicolor knitting for a bit of texture:
Suke-Suke Cowl by Olgajazzy (Ravelry pattern).  This designer invents stitch patterns you don't see elsewhere.  Suke-Suke has pleats and dropped stitches. 
Here's what it looks like before the drops:
And it's reversible.  Other side, after drops:
Artemis modeling:

The vivid green color looks accurate in the photos.  It's called Granny Smith Apple, in Feederbrook Common Ground.  
Come cold weather, Emily will wear this cowl. 

Now MA insists I finish my novel so she can find out what happens.  When someone else starts referring to fictional characters you've invented as real people, well, it's time to go to work. 

LK

Saturday, August 2, 2014

In which Artemis models in the garden

It's a beautiful afternoon here in LK land.  After various chores, some involving actual physical effort, Artemis joined us outside for her first modeling gig in the garden:
Our garden is a little strange because it's designed for the bees.  One of which tried to chase me away as I photographed.  She and I had a little chat along the lines of "I'll be out of your way as fast as I can" from me while she buzzed around my hair.  Apparently there was some communication because she retired to that useful stand of bee balm on the left in the photo and got back to her own work, leaving me to mine.

Anyway, here's what I really wanted to show you on Artemis:

 This is a pattern called Spokes.  I saw it on Ravelry and immediately went stash-diving to see what I could experiment with. As you may have gathered, I'm addicted to modular knitting and to combining yarns and colors.
           You start at the neck, which allows you to see if your yarn combo is working:
I could tell immediately that yarns and pattern were getting along famously.  When I got to the odd short-row design in the center back I thought, what the hey and went along with it.  My policy is always to let designers have their way if the idea potentially makes sense.  Well, this one worked big time.  Spokes hangs perfectly.  It's the shawl I've been looking for almost as long as I'd searched for Artemis.  OK, maybe not that long.  But this one keeps your shoulders and neck warm.  That short-row action in the center back does the trick.  Brilliant.
I used Madelinetosh Merino Light in a gray-green called Celadon for the garter spokes and some Noro Silk Garden Sock for the gradient.

Then yesterday while working my Friday afternoon shift at ST I ran across a new Madelinetosh Merino Light color called Optic and fell in love.  I've combined it with an ancient skein of Misti Alpaca Sock in a color I don't think is made anymore:

Click on the photo to get the whole positive/negative effect.
This, folks, is why we keep stash.  You run across some yarn that's really gorgeous.  Then at some point two yarns or a yarn+pattern will suddenly work and you can't stop knitting.  Started this second Spokes last night. 

More photographs to come in the next few days.  Artemis and I (and the bees) have been busy.

LK




Tuesday, July 29, 2014

MA's Gyre

MA just finished her version of Gyre.  It's the same yarn and size as mine, but she completed the whole pattern length.  Here it is modeled by her granddaughter:


This is Gyre, exactly as written. Gorgeous.  Now compare length to mine in same yarn:

Wow.  What a difference.
Love them both.
Thanks MA for letting me photograph your trophy.

LK



Monday, July 28, 2014

Artemis

Meet Artemis:

Artemis and I have been searching for each other for, oh, let's say 15 years.  When I brought her home from the lovely store in Geneva where I found her, my husband said, wow, you've been wanting one of those forever. 

I immediately put Artemis to work in my studio, which she seems to enjoy:
Here's she's modeling the back of the entrelac cardigan I've been inventing out of Noro Taiyo sock yarn.  If you look very very closely at the right side you can see the arm scythe.  In which there will be a sleeve.  Eventually.  Artemis doesn't have arms but we'll work something out, I'm sure.

One of you faithful readers pointed out yesterday that I'd stalled out months ago here on Gyre and that I had some catching up to do. 

OK.  I'm on it.  As you can see.

LK


Tuesday, May 6, 2014

OK, I got wild and crazy and ...

started another Gyre in skinny Shibui Cima.  Cima is kind of a heavy lace weight, if that makes sense.  Last thing I made out of it was Cladonia #2 on a U.S. 7 needle and it's one of my favorite shawls ever.  So I grabbed some out of stash in color UV and cast on.

I test blocked it still on the needle and look:





That's the needle at the bottom -- Gyre is worked top-down.  So the part at the very top is the neckline.  I used a #5 needle for the first 15 or so rows before sizing up to a #6 needle.  After all, I'd made that shawl on a #7 needle successfully.  When the pattern says to size up to the larger needle, I'll go to the #7.  And will make a larger size than medium, though I don't know how much larger yet.  Gotta get there first (all Gyre sizes start out with exactly the same number of stitches and increases).

This is what the neckline bit of Gyre looks like in the prescribed yarn weight:

Lacey but not as lacey as Cima.  Cima version's eyelets and ribbing up close:

The downside of this will be that I'll be knitting lots of extra rows to get the length, though not zillions more.  I have three skeins in stash and another three on hold at the store, though five will probably be enough.  I've been wearing both Maya and Sol Degrade versions of the sweater and think a floaty version would be fun to wear as well.  I love floaty garments.  Maybe because I wore a lot of power suits in my previous career.  Remind me to tell you sometime, though, about how different the businesspeople I interviewed reacted to Lisa in a power suit vs. Lisa dressed in a sweater and skirt -- different better for the sweater outfit.  Clothing is theater, you know?

I must be easily entertained or something because I'm having a great time playing with this pattern and yarn combination.

Class starts tomorrow, Weds. 5/7,  at 7pm at String Theory if you want to join us at yarn play.
And yes, that's a double entendre.

LK

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Just what I've always wanted: a shawl with sleeves.

How many times has a shawl fallen off my shoulders and landed in the dust?  This happened literally last Thursday when I got out of the car to open the gate at MB's farm in South Carolina.  It was dry and warm there.  While MB and I are hugging in greeting, her husband looked over the gate at a pile of blue.  "What's that?"  Didn't even occur to me it was my silk and cashmere shawl.  Not to worry, it survived just fine.  But really, wouldn't it be wonderful to have a shawl with sleeves?

Meet Gyre.  This is another of those patterns that you can't tell from the pattern pictures what it's really going to look like.  Never fear, I've made it twice now -- yup, shawl with sleeves. This is just so much fun to wear.

First I made it in Maya, a DK which is exactly the gauge called for.  We had some black at the store, so black it is, made short for short me:

Janet stood still for me long enough to shoot a picture.  Here's the back:
This is a wonderfully comfortable cardigan. But can you tell from these photos how shawl-like Gyre is?

To quote Monty Python, "wait for it..."

Meet my second Gyre, modeled by Susan, knitted in Lang Sol de Grade:

Wear it straight:
Wear it draped:
Or both!
I'm thinking of making it in fingering weight next.  You know, like a shawl.  Maybe bead the eyelets:
And yes, those are dropped stitches.  You all know how I love to drop stitches on purpose. 

After trying on Gyre, would it surprise you that people want a class for Gyre?  There are a few tricky bits to this sweater, including making sure those dropped stitches don't get carried away.  Fit, though, is no big deal.  Because it's a -- repeat after me -- shawl with sleeves.

Class begins on Wednesday May 7 at 7pm, then meets Wednesdays May 14, June 11 and June 25.  Call the store if you want to sign up; there are a few slots open.
Materials:  Pattern in Spring 2014 Interweave Knits (you can buy a digital download at
                    www.interweavestore.com)
                  1000-1300 yards DK or light worsted weight, such as Maya or Rowan Softknit Cotton,      
                  with sizes 7 circ and 8 long circ needles
                  or
                  at least 1000 yards of Aran weight, such as Sol de Grade, with sizes 8 and 9 circs
                  or
                  get wild and crazy and make it in fingering weight.  Like a shawl.


See ya.
LK










Monday, April 21, 2014